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Sports and Politics: a cracking career path?

8th June 2017

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Martin Sheridan: Olympics hero & US athlete extraordinaire

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John Wisden, founder of Wisden Cricketers’ Almanack

16th March 2017

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Golf » Golf Books » Golf Biographies » F.G. TAIT: A RECORD, BEING HIS LIFE, LETTERS, AND GOLFING DIARY

F.G. TAIT: A RECORD, BEING HIS LIFE, LETTERS, AND GOLFING DIARY

F.G. TAIT: A RECORD, BEING HIS LIFE, LETTERS, AND GOLFING DIARY

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Golf book. With an introduction by Andrew Lang. Frederick Guthrie Tait (1870-1900) was born in Edinburgh, the son of a leading physicist and amateur golfer. He was educated at Edinburgh Academy and Sedbergh before entering RMA, Sandhurst, where he introduced golf. A very powerful and long hitter, at the R&A, St Andrews, on Jan 11, 1893, he hit the ball 250 yards onto frozen ground stopping 341 yards from the tee, thereby refuting his father's calculation that 190 yards was the maximum possible flight of a ball. Tait won the the Amateur Championship twice (1896, 1898), finished third in the Open Championship twice (1896, 1897) and was leading amateur in the same competition six times. He was also a crack shot and a first-class rugby player. Tait was killed in action at Koodoosbergh during the second Boer War. In a pocket on his dead body was found a letter showing the paw marks of his favourite dog "Nails". All profits from original sales of this book were donated to the Black Watch Widows' and Orphans' Fund.

First Edition. 8vo. 304pp. Portrait frontis. (tissue-guard), 16 plates (tissue-guards). Bound in attractive full calf, raised bands and gilt embossed spine label, marbled endpapers. Internally clean and bright, tissue guards intact, mild foxing to prelims else very good condition.   [D&M, 3460]

Date
1900
Publisher
J. Nisbet
Author
John Laing LOW

£110.00 (Code: 27902)

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